The Santa Clarita City Council and community members will be holding a dedication event for the renaming of River Village Park to Duane R. Harte Park at River Village on Monday, May 23, 2016 at 3:30 p.m. at River Village Park, located at 26401 Riverrock Way (at the intersection of Santa Clarita Parkway and Riverrock Way).

The park is being renamed for the late Duane R. Harte who was well known in the Santa Clarita community for being a committed volunteer, community advocate and former chairman of the Santa Clarita Parks, Recreation and Community Services Commission.

The Santa Clarita City Council voted to rename the park earlier this year. “This is a deserving way for Harte to be honored by a community he gave so much to,” said Mayor Bob Kellar. “He was tremendously involved and for years worked to make Santa Clarita a better place,” he added.

The soon-to-be renamed park opened to the public in February of last year and is the 30th City of Santa Clarita Park.  The 29-acre park encompasses 24 acres of open space in the River Village community and five acres of developed park site with a themed play area, group picnic shelters, perimeter walkway and restrooms.


 

Longtime Santa Clarita Valley resident Duane R. Harte — a man remembered as a tireless volunteer, a stalwart community advocate, a loyal friend and a true patriot — died early Monday morning of a heart attack. He was 68. He will be missed by all.

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. - The Wall That Heals, a half-size replica of the black granite Vietnam Wall in Washington, D.C., is open to the public free of charge at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum in Simi Valley.

The wall, which honors those who died in the Vietnam War or remain missing, will stay open around the clock through 5 p.m. Sunday.

About 55 police and veterans with the Patriot Guard and Rolling Thunder rode motorcycles alongside the wall as it arrived in Simi Valley on Wednesday morning. The wall includes the names of more than 58,000 men and women, just like the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

 

 

Harry Wilson, 70, a Simi Valley resident who served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War, helped escort the wall from its most recent display area at Porter Ranch.

“I’m very proud to do this. I’m a veteran, and I honor all the people that were lost in any war,” said Wilson.

Simi Valley Police Commander Robert Arabian also helped escort the wall through Simi Valley.

“We got a lot of thumbs-up, smiles and waves from drivers, which was actually very nice, Arabian said.

Noah Koziel and other Seabees from Naval Base Ventura County Port Hueneme helped erect the wall at the Reagan Library. It opened to the public at noon.

“This is just a little bit we can do to help honor the sacrifice they made for our country,” said Koziel.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund takes the wall all over the United States. Tim Tetz, the organization’s director of outreach, said the wall stops at 35 locations a year and this is the first time it has been displayed at a presidential library.

He said 120 community volunteers will be helping with the display during its stay in Simi Valley.

“It’s magical to see at night with the lights on it,” Tetz said.

He recalled one time when a man came to the wall looking for the name of a soldier, whom he had recently learned was his son.

“It was an opportunity for him to pay respect to the boy he never knew,” Tetz said.

Accompanying the replica is a mobile education center that displays the photos of some of the service members whose names are on the wall.

An opening ceremony for The Wall That Heals will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday and will include the reading of all 106 Ventura County residents whose names are on the wall.

Veterans will be at the wall to answer questions from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday. And on Saturday, a free screening of the movie “Brave! Common Men, Uncommon Valor” will take place at 1 p.m. at the Reagan Library. The movie tells the story of Bravo Company, First Battalion, 26th Marine Regiment, which was trapped in the siege of Khe Sanh during the Vietnam War.

The Vietnam Memorial Collection, made up of items collected at the Vietnam Wall in Washington, will be on display at the library until Nov. 30.

Melissa Giller, the library’s communication director, said the National Park Service loaned about 40 items from its collection. They include letters left to loved ones, wedding rings, stuffed animals, even a harmonica with a personal story behind it.

“They’re the most touching items you’ll ever see,” Giller said.

For more information, call the Reagan Library at 522-2977.

Copyright 2015 Journal Media Group. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Like us on Facebook

To be one of the 33+ people receiving notifications from the "American Legion Riders 507" website subscribe to our mailing list.


 Poll 

Going to ALR DOC Rally?

Yes

No

57%

42%